Waggy Tails Rescue Logo Registered Charity No: 1114957

Autumn Fair, Barrington Centre, Ferndown, Saturday 19th October

Thank you to everyone who supported the Autumn Fair.  We hope you enjoyed the morning and our thanks go to Rod who provided the musical entertainment for us.…read more

Christmas Cards and Calendars

Our Christmas cards and 2020 Calendar are now available in our shops or from the office.  Cards are £2 for a pack of four.  There are two different packs of rehomed dogs and a 4 pack of the cartoon Waggy Tails dog. Calendars can also be purchased through ebay follow the link here:-

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/waggytails143/m.html?item=152702023364&hash=item238dbff6c4%3Ag%3ArcMAAOSwdnZaFcSB&rt=nc&_trksid=p2047675.l2562

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Charity Partner – Intergage

This year we have been adopted by Intergage as their Charity partner.  On Thursday 12th October Ginny, Myra and Ross were invited to their offices, as they had a surprise for us.  They are updating our website for us and after a review of the progress, the whole workforce came in to listen to a short talk about the history of Waggy Tails.  We were then presented with a cheque for £863.20 – a magnificent sum which will be put to good use to benefit the dogs.  Ross behaved impeccably, apart from sticking his head in the waste paper bin when we arrived and taking out the contents very gently.  Our thanks go to everyone who is working so hard to help raise money.

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Lungworm outbreak in Dorset

Dog owners are being warned about a deadly infection.

There have been 45 cases of lungworm reported across Dorset.

This number includes 16 in the greater Bournemouth area, two in Christchurch, three in Blandford and two in Poole.

Lungworm can be fatal to dogs – nine per cent of infected dogs will die – and it is spreading throughout the UK.

The full article can be seen on the Echo website:-

https://www.bournemouthecho.co.uk/news/17919998.warning-dog-owners-fatal-infection-outbreak-dorset/read more

Dog Presentation – next 2nd November 2019

On the first Saturday of each month we hold our Dog Presentation, starting at 10am at West Parley Memorial Hall, BH22 8SQ. The dogs in our care are brought along by their Foster parents so that prospective adopters can see them and learn a little more about their lives so far. The presentation is followed by time to view the dogs on the field behind the hall and then the Induction Meeting at 11am which all prospective Adopters are required to attend. We  advise you to arrive by 9.45am as car parking is at a premium. We start promptly and ask you to be punctual as latecomers disrupt the presentation. We look forward to seeing you and volunteers will be on hand to answer your questions. Please ensure that you have suitable footwear for the field.…read more

BH Coastal Lottery – help support Waggy Tails by buying a ticket – it’s our 25th Anniversary

20/07/19 – one of our supporters won £250 this week. To be in with a chance please buy a ticket.20/07/19 - one of our supporters won £250 this week. To be in with a chance please buy a ticket.

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Adopting an Oldie – read our story

In July 2015 we went to a Waggy Tails Meeting at Parley Hall ready to have an introduction to all the dogs needing a new home. We weren’t sure we were quite ready to adopt a dog but wanted to start the process.

As soon as we arrived the yellow Waggy Tails van appeared in the car park and  a moment later Ella the wire haired dachshund hopped out of the van and straight into our hearts! It was love at first sight.  We stayed for the meeting and met Ella properly – finding out that she was 10 years old didn’t matter a jot. We were advised that Ella was ‘rather rotund and enjoys short walks’ – an apt description at the time!  However with carrots replacing (some) biscuits and a steady increase in exercise Ella again had a bounce in her paws and a new lease of life. She welcomed every day , every person and every experience with a wag and , we are convinced,  a smile. What a wonderful philosophy to live by and one we have tried to emulate.
We had 3 and a half beautiful years with our darling girl and would not change a thing. We were heartbroken when her time came to pass but the love and support received by family, friends and Waggy Tails helped us each day. The constant message of love we heard was that we had given Ella a golden time in her older years and that she was one lucky pooch
We feel we are the lucky ones and our luck,it seems, continues as we then  met Benji the Jack Russell Cross at the January 2019, Waggy Tails Meeting. He was bundled up in a big blue coat so we could not see how teeny he was, but we could see he  had twinkly eyes and perky little ears – what a sweetie.  When we heard Benji was 11 we knew we had to have him! So, Benji became our boy at the end of January 2019 and has become a much loved addition to our family.  Benji has no idea he is an ‘older’ dog – evident by the way he flings himself down the stairs so as not to miss out on any fun, how he has worked out he can reach the dining room table through some daredevil climbing and in the way he pulls a perfect ‘begging’ pose if he feels he is not the centre of attention! With Benji we walk , laugh and play every day – it is a joy and good for the soul.
We would highly recommend adopting a pet who has already had some life experience . They can teach you their funny ways as they get used to yours. It is an honour to be entrusted with any pooch in need of a new start in life but to be able to offer this to an older dog is even more precious.
We have been doubly blessed with older Waggy Tails Pooches and hope that you will be too.
Hannah & David

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Amazon Smile – please join and support Waggy Tails

If you shop with Amazon you can now help us at the same time by choosing Waggy Tails Rescue as your Amazon Smile charity. No extra cost to you but we get a little of their vast profits!

Sign in to smile.amazon.co.uk on your desktop or mobile phone browser. From your desktop, go to Your Account from the navigation at the top of any page and then select the option to Change your Charity. Just type in Waggy Tails Rescue & select us.

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Starting Life with Your Rescue Dog – by Denise Nuttall

 
Don’t try too hard.I work with a lot of owners of rescue dogs. Many rescue dogs can settle in well, but an awful lot find it difficult. I find that looking at dogs from the human perspective is helpful in drawing comparisons as to how they might feel. Yes, I am afraid to say that I believe anthropomorphism can be a good thing and don’t let anyone tell you otherwise (unless they are trying to suggest that your dog will be unhappy unless he is wearing Gucci…. In which case, that is another matter!)During the second world war, to keep them safe from the Blitz, many children living in London were shipped to the countryside to live with strangers; however, many of these children struggled emotionally to cope with being separated from their family and moved into a different environment (country versus city).  Many suffered long term emotional damage because of this emotional disruption. If you compare this to the experience of a dog being  re-homed, I feel sure their feelings are similar.  Yet, many dogs have gone through this several times before arriving at their “forever” home. I think it is fair to say, a dog that has been re-homed often feels insecure, anxious and frightened. Some may even feel frustrated and angry.

From the owner’s perspective – wanting to do the right thing – the first thing they often do is to take their new dog out for a lovely long walk; meet their family, friends and lots of dogs and book them onto the first available dog training classes – and that is just on the first day! This is done in the belief that this dog will enjoy it, because, after all dogs like other dogs and people, and they all love long walks. Not so much actually. It may surprise some to find that a rescue dog often just wants to figure out where home is and who he should trust first and this can take time. They need a lot of recovery time. Rest is a big part of this. If these dogs, whilst in a stressed state, are exposed to lots of different stimuli, it is likely that they will quickly reach crisis point. It is better to take things nice and slowly with them. This is when it is very useful to be aware of how to read canine body language in fine detail so that you can evaluate how well your new friend is coping.

I have spoken to many owners of rescue dogs whose behaviour has deteriorated rapidly a week or so after adoption. This is almost always because of the dog becoming stressed, and this often occurs accidentally whilst the owner is trying to do what they feel is the right thing.

My suggestion is that a new rescue dog should settle in the home for a good few days before attempting to take him out for walks. Don’t arrange any visitors to the home for at least several weeks. Establish a den for your rescue dog at home, where he can be sure he won’t be disturbed by anyone. Let him have access to this space as much as he needs or wants and regularly scatter some bits of food in his area for him to forage. A few activity toys such as Classic Kong and treat ball toys left in his area should encourage him back again and again. Whilst we do want a rescue dog to bond with us, we do not want to encourage an excessively needy bond. Short periods left to his own devices in his safe space will set him up towards being able to cope on his own. This safe place can be improved by plugging in an Adaptil diffuser (Adaptil is a synthetic form of the mother dog’s pheromones she produces after giving birth and reduces anxiety in dogs). You can also try playing classical music for him, as this can be calming for many animals.

Only after your dog appears to settle and feel relaxed should you think about taking him out for a walk. If you don’t know his background, just assume he has no experience of the outdoors and introduce him to it as if it was his first time. Take him to quiet, calm areas first, away from too much traffic and people. If he copes well with this, then you can always take him somewhere a little more exciting in a few days. Keep the walks short and fun so that he does not become stressed. If you approach your rescue dog in this way, your dog will gradually start to feel safe and secure with you, trusting you to keep him safe and start to develop confidence in his world. For some dogs this can take many months. If you are unsure, it is better to consult a qualified dog behaviourist so that you can develop a structured plan towards helping your rescue dog to settle in to his new world.

Denise Nuttall – Dog Behaviourist & Trainer, M.Res, B.Sc (Hons). Full Member APBC. Full Member of TCBTS. MAPDT 00963.

 

 

 

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Volunteer Fundraisers wanted

Fundraising helps us to supplement the income from our shops and look after more animals at the Sanctuary. Could you help organise the events we currently have and  come up with some fresh ideas to help us?  If you are interested please contact us on 01202 875000 for more information or download a volunteer form from the website.…read more